Withdrawal from Congress 2021 in Support of the Black Canadian Studies Association

Having a bilingual mission as the cornerstone of its identity, the Association of Canadian and Québécois Literatures is an association founded on the principle of relationship-building across a diversity of perspectives and cultural experiences. Given this ideal and given the concerns brought forward by the Black Canadian Studies Association, the Executive Committee of ACQL does not feel that Congress 2021 can provide the space of inclusivity that we would hope to offer our members. As such, the Executive Committee of ACQL has decided to withdraw from participating in Congress 2021 and hold its 2021 conference independently in a virtual format.

Although cognizant of some measures taken by the Federation to address the concerns brought forward, we have made the decision to withdraw from Congress 2021 as an expression of support for our colleagues at the Black Canadian Studies Association whose voices have brought attention to experiences of racism and exclusion that we need to do a better job of confronting and working to eliminate. We also take this action in support of other associations who, like BCSA, have made the difficult decision to withdraw from this year’s Congress. ACQL traditionally looks to Congress as an important site of the exchange of ideas and relationship-building, but with the absence of so many voices, the ACQL Executive does not see that Congress can offer this ideal this year. Furthermore, we recognize that there is work to do to ensure that Congress can be experienced as a more inclusive and safe space in the future and commit to enacting that change.

In voting to hold an independent virtual ACQL conference for 2021, the Executive Committee seeks not only to support those of you who have begun to prepare your presentations, but also to include participants who would otherwise remain absent. In moving to an independent venue, ACQL will honour the commitment originally made by the Federation to waive the conference fees for all conference participants who self-identify as Black or Indigenous.

The Executive has begun to envision ways in which we can effect change, but also recognizes that our association has much work to do. To this end, we offer two immediate starting points. Firstly, we have added to our program a session in which we invite all of you to contribute to a discussion on decolonization and anti-racism in academia. Secondly, at the 2021 annual general meeting, we wish to hold a discussion with our members on more long-term measures that we can enact to make our association more equitable, inclusive, and diverse.

In the weeks to come, we will publish the conference program and provide you with more details regarding our online venue and registration.

Pierre-Yves Mocquais, Francophone plenary speaker, ACQL 2021

Pierre-Yves Mocquais, Francophone plenary speaker, ACQL 2021

The ACQL is pleased to announce that Pierre-Yves Mocquais, professor and dean of the University of Alberta’s campus of Saint-Jean, will give a plenary talk at our annual conference at Congress 2021.

Pierre-Yves Mocquais est professeur titulaire et doyen du Campus Saint-Jean de l’Université de l’Alberta. Il est co-président de l’Association des Collèges et Universités de la Francophonie Canadienne (ACUFC) et du Consortium National de Formation en Santé (CNFS). À l’université de Regina, il a été directeur du département de français, fondateur et directeur du Centre canadien de recherche sur les francophonies minoritaires et du Canadian Institute for Peace, Justice and Security et vice-doyen à l’enseignement et à la recherche. À l’Université de Calgary, il a été doyen de la faculté des humanités, doyen fondateur du Language Research Center et président de l’Alliance française de Calgary. Ses recherches ont porté sur la génétique textuelle et l’œuvre de l’écrivain québécois Hubert Aquin, notamment à travers l’ouvrage Hubert Aquin ou la quête interrompue et une édition critique du roman Neige Noire. Plus récemment, ses recherches se sont concentrées sur la francophonie canadienne, la littérature du Québec et du Canada français, la francophonie en contexte linguistique minoritaire, la culture francophone des Prairies, les récits et textes de mémoire et les questions d’identité francophone en milieu minoritaire et de survivances culturelles. Il a été l’éditeur de plusieurs volumes collectifs sur la Francophonie de l’Ouest canadien, notamment Langages et écritures de l’exil. L’ouest canadien, terre d’asile, terre d’exil, publié en 2018 aux Presses de l’Université Laval.

Call for Papers (Reminder)

The deadline of October 31st for submissions for member-organized sessions is fast approaching. Please find the Call for Papers for the 2021 ACQL Conference via the link below. An announcement will be made in early November regarding the nature (in person, hybrid, virtual) of the conference.

Call for Papers

The Winner of the 2019 Gabrielle Roy Prize (English Section)

The Association for Canadian and Quebec Literatures (ACQL) is pleased to announce that the winner of the 2019 Gabrielle Roy Prize (English section), which each year honours the best work of Canadian literary criticism written in English, is Jody Mason for Home Feelings: Liberal Citizenship and the Canadian Reading Camp Movement (McGill-Queen’s University Press). The winner was chosen by a jury composed of Margery Fee (University of British Columbia), Heidi Tiedemann Darroch (Camosun College), and Veronica Austen (St. Jerome’s University). The Prize is expected to be awarded in person at Congress, next Spring 2021.

Jody Mason’s Home Feelings: Liberal Citizenship and the Canadian Reading Camp Movement distinguishes itself for its tremendous research and critical insight. In constructing an analysis of the Canadian Reading Camp Association, the precursor to Frontier College, Mason offers insight into how reading and literacy were used in a citizenship-building project to form workers as liberal subjects and prevent the radicalization of immigrants. She draws on a range of primary sources – reports, letters, government documents – to construct a meticulously detailed historical account that allows her to form new theoretical insight about the ideological construction and functioning of reading and literacy. Mason is to be particularly commended for the impressive rigour of this book.

The jury would also like to congratulate the two other finalists in this year’s competition (in alphabetical order): Tony Tremblay for The Fiddlehead Moment: Pioneering an Alternative Canadian Modernism in New Brunswick (McGill-Queen’s University Press) and J.A. Weingarten for Sharing the Past: The Reinvention of History in Canadian Poetry since 1960 (University of Toronto Press).

Tony Tremblay’s The Fiddlehead Moment: Pioneering an Alternative Canadian Modernism in New Brunswick offers a careful and detailed assessment of the careers of three key New Brunswick writers, Alfred Bailey, Desmond Pacey, and Fred Cogswell. Through a wide-ranging examination of why modernism took the form it did in New Brunswick, Tremblay constructs an impressively detailed history of the Fiddlehead School of modernism. In doing so, Tremblay offers a compelling refashioning of Canadian literary modernism that considers the traditionally neglected role New Brunswick plays in broader national currents of literary modernism. Through this impressive work, our sense of Canadian literary modernism is expanded.

J.A. Weingarten’s Sharing the Past: The Reinvention of History in Canadian Poetry since 1960 astutely examines lyric poetry to expand our view of post-1960 Canadian literature’s engagement with history-making. Noting an overemphasis on postmodernist novels, and subsequently a tendency to view history-making in Canadian literature through the lens of historiographic metafiction, Weingarten pushes the discourse to consider how such writers as Al Purdy, John Newlove, Lorna Crozier, Barry McKinnon, Andrew Suknaski, Margaret Atwood, and Joan Crate move beyond the usual postmodern undermining of knowable truth to investigate local, social, and familial histories. Sharing the Past demonstrates extremely thorough research, and Weingarten’s ability to weave together discussions of the numerous writers and their work creates a wonderfully engaging reading experience.

For more information:

Veronica Austen

Chair of the Jury (Anglophone Section), ACQL/ALCQ

vjausten@uwaterloo.ca

The Finalists for the Gabrielle Roy Prize 2019

[:en]The Association for Canadian and Quebec Literatures (ACQL) is pleased to announce the finalists for the 2019 Gabrielle Roy Prize (English section), which each year honours the best work of Canadian literary criticism published in English. This year’s shortlisted finalists (in alphabetical order) are Jody Mason for Home Feelings: Liberal Citizenship and the Canadian Reading Camp Movement (McGill-Queen’s University Press), Tony Tremblay for The Fiddlehead Moment: Pioneering an Alternative Canadian Modernism in New Brunswick (McGill-Queen’s University Press), and J. A. Weingarten for Sharing the Past: The Reinvention of History in Canadian Poetry since 1960 (University of Toronto Press). The shortlist was chosen by a jury composed of Margery Fee (University of British Columbia), Heidi Tiedemann-Darroch (Camosun College), and Veronica Austen (St. Jerome’s University). The winner will be announced publicly on September 15th 2020.

For more information, please contact:

Veronica Austen

Chair of the Jury, English Section, ACQL/ALCQ

Department of English

St. Jerome’s University at the University of Waterloo

vjausten@uwaterloo.ca

Eftihia Mihelakis

Présidente du Jury, section francophone, ALCQ/ACQL

Department of Classical and Modern Languages

Brandon University

MihelakisE@brandonu.ca[:fr]L’Association des littératures canadienne et québécoise (ALCQ) est heureuse d’annoncer la liste des finalistes pour l’obtention du Prix Gabrielle-Roy 2019 (section francophone) qui récompense chaque année le meilleur ouvrage de critique littéraire écrit en français portant sur les littératures canadienne et/ou québécoise. Les finalistes sont (en ordre alphabétique) : Lucie Hotte et Johanne Melançon pour l’ouvrage collectif Robert Dickson. Écrire en temps de paix relative (Éditions Prise de parole) ; Marie-Andrée Lamontagne pour Anne Hébert, vivre pour écrire (Les Éditions du Boréal) ; Pamela V. Sing et Jimmy Thibeault pour l’ouvrage collectif Marguerite-A. Primeau, première femme de lettres du Far Ouest canadien (Les Éditions David). Ces finalistes ont été choisis par un jury formé de Daniel Laforest (The University of Alberta), Julien Lefort-Favreau (Queen’s University) et Eftihia Mihelakis (Brandon University). Le nom du lauréat ou de la lauréate sera annoncé publiquement le 15 septembre 2020.

The Association for Canadian and Quebec Literatures (ACQL) is pleased to announce the finalists for the 2019 Gabrielle Roy Prize (English section), which each year honours the best work of Canadian literary criticism published in English. This year’s shortlisted finalists (in alphabetical order) are Jody Mason for Home Feelings: Liberal Citizenship and the Canadian Reading Camp Movement (McGill-Queen’s University Press), Tony Tremblay for The Fiddlehead Moment: Pioneering an Alternative Canadian Modernism in New Brunswick (McGill-Queen’s University Press), and J. A. Weingarten for Sharing the Past: The Reinvention of History in Canadian Poetry since 1960 (University of Toronto Press). The shortlist was chosen by a jury composed of Margery Fee (University of British Columbia), Heidi Tiedemann-Darroch (Camosun College), and Veronica Austen (St. Jerome’s University). The winner will be announced publicly on September 15th 2020.

Renseignements :

Eftihia Mihelakis

Présidente du Jury, section francophone, ALCQ/ACQL

Department of Classical and Modern Languages

Brandon University

MihelakisE@brandonu.ca 

Veronica Austen

Chair of the Jury, English Section, ACQL/ALCQ

Department of English

St. Jerome’s University at the University of Waterloo

vjausten@uwaterloo.ca[:]

[:en]Janet Paterson Plenary Speaker ACQL 2020[:fr]Janet Paterson Table Ronde plénière 2020[:]

[:en]Janet Paterson Plenary Speaker ACQL 2020[:fr]Janet Paterson Table Ronde plénière 2020[:]

[:en]The ACQL is pleased and honored to announce that Janet Paterson, Professor Emerita of French (University of Toronto), will be one of our plenary speakers at the June 2020 annual conference at Western University. Co-organized with APFUCC, a Round Table entitled « La traversée des frontières. Une conversation avec Janet M. Paterson, Université de Toronto », and moderated by Tara Collington, Catherine Khordoc, and Karin Schwerdtner, will present an interactive exploration of a number of “frontiers” in French Studies that Paterson’s publications have challenged over the years.

Du déploiement de la sémiotique à l’avènement des théories « queer », de l’étude de romans canoniques à celle des écritures minoritaires, de la transmission de cours magistraux à la pratique d’une pédagogie interactive, du passage, enfin, d’un « Même » socioculturel à un « Autre » multiple et hétérogène, ce sont les frontières des études françaises qui ont été remises en question ou bien franchies depuis plus d’un quart de siècle. Et pourtant, ce sont précisément les limites et les contours de notre savoir littéraire et de sa dissémination qui nous sollicitent d’urgence aujourd’hui. Le moment est venu en effet d’explorer des terrains culturels inédits, de dépasser certaines limites épistémologiques afin d’identifier de nouveaux espaces ; espaces fluides, souples, multidimensionnels à l’image de notre société ; espaces propices à l’épanouissement des savoirs, de l’enseignement universitaire et de diverses cultures. C’est ce que nous proposons de discuter avec Janet M. Paterson dans le cadre de cette table ronde.

Janet Paterson est l’auteure de trois livres importants sur le roman québécois : Anne Hébert: architexture romanesque (Les Éditions de l’Université d’Ottawa, 1985), Moments postmodernes dans le roman québécois (Les Presses de l’Université d’Ottawa, 1990 ; traduit en anglais, University of Toronto Press, 1994) et Figures de l’Autre dans le roman québécois (Nota Bene, 2004). Elle a aussi rédigé un nombre important de chapitres de livres et d’articles parus dans des revues telles : Voix et Images, Études littéraires, University of Toronto Quarterly, Nouvelles Études francophones, et Yale French Studies, entre autres. Elle a dirigé ou codirigé trois collectifs et quatre numéros spéciaux de revue. Il ne faut pas non plus oublier ses contributions à la vie académique en tant que directrice du Département d’études françaises à Toronto, vice-doyenne de la Faculty of Arts & Science et, pendant dix ans, Principale à Innis College.[:fr]L’ALCQ a le plaisir d’annoncer que Janet M. Paterson, professeure émérite de l’Université de Toronto, donnera une conférencière plénière lors du colloque annuel au Congrès 2020 à l’Université Western. Une table ronde conjointe avec l’APFUCC intitulée « La traversée des frontières. Une conversation avec Janet M. Paterson, Université de Toronto », animée par les professeures Tara Collington, Catherine Khordoc et Karin Schwerdtner, présentera une exploration interactive des nombreuses frontières en études françaises que les publications de Paterson ont remises en question.

Du déploiement de la sémiotique à l’avènement des théories « queer », de l’étude de romans canoniques à celle des écritures minoritaires, de la transmission de cours magistraux à la pratique d’une pédagogie interactive, du passage, enfin, d’un « Même » socioculturel à un « Autre » multiple et hétérogène, ce sont les frontières des études françaises qui ont été remises en question ou bien franchies depuis plus d’un quart de siècle. Et pourtant, ce sont précisément les limites et les contours de notre savoir littéraire et de sa dissémination qui nous sollicitent d’urgence aujourd’hui. Le moment est venu en effet d’explorer des terrains culturels inédits, de dépasser certaines limites épistémologiques afin d’identifier de nouveaux espaces ; espaces fluides, souples, multidimensionnels à l’image de notre société ; espaces propices à l’épanouissement des savoirs, de l’enseignement universitaire et de diverses cultures. C’est ce dont nous proposons de discuter avec Janet M. Paterson dans le cadre de cette table ronde.

Janet Paterson est l’auteure de trois livres importants sur le roman québécois : Anne Hébert: architexture romanesque (Les Éditions de l’Université d’Ottawa, 1985), Moments postmodernes dans le roman québécois (Les Presses de l’Université d’Ottawa, 1990 ; traduit en anglais, University of Toronto Press, 1994) et Figures de l’Autre dans le roman québécois (Nota Bene, 2004). Elle a aussi rédigé un nombre important de chapitres de livres et d’articles parus dans des revues telles : Voix et Images, Études littéraires, University of Toronto Quarterly, Nouvelles Études francophones, et Yale French Studies, entre autres. Elle a dirigé ou codirigé trois collectifs et quatre numéros spéciaux de revue. Il ne faut pas non plus oublier ses contributions à la vie académique en tant que directrice du Département d’études françaises à Toronto, vice-doyenne de la Faculty of Arts & Science et, pendant dix ans, Principale à Innis College.[:]

[:en]DMR Bentley Plenary Speaker ACQL [:fr]DMR Bentley Conférencier ALCQ juin 2020[:]

[:en]DMR Bentley Plenary Speaker ACQL [:fr]DMR Bentley Conférencier ALCQ juin 2020[:]

The ACQL is pleased and honored to announce that D.M.R. Bentley, Distinguished Professor of Canadian Literature, will be one of our plenary speakers at the June 2020 annual conference at Western University. The title of his presentation is “Archibald Lampman and Islamic Culture.”

“Modern life is vast and complex, and the poet often finds that such primary feelings as belong to all ages and places may be dealt with more freely and with a sharper accentuation, when they are wrought upon a background of ruder and simpler custom.” This apologia for Pre-Raphaelite medievalism by Archibald Lampman applies very well to an almost entirely neglected group of his works that use medieval and Renaissance Islamic culture as a “background”: a ballad (“A Spanish Taunt”) and an untitled fragment of a novel both set near the beginning of the Reconquista of Spain, and three poems – “Abu Midjan,” “Baki,” and “The Vase of Ibn Mokbil” – set in earlier phases of Islamic culture. By situating the five works in the contexts of Romantic-Victorian Orientalism, their sources in such works as Washington Irving’s Chronicle of the Conquest of Granada (1829) and Al-Makkari’s History of the Mohammedan Dynasties in Spain (1840, 1843), Lampman’s growing hostility to aspects of Christianity, and the loathing of avaricious individualism that took him to socialism, the paper will uncover a hitherto hidden and important aspect of one of English Canada’s most accomplished and enduringly relevant nineteenth-century writers.

D.M.R. Bentley is a Distinguished University Professor and the Carl F. Klinck Professor in Canadian Literature at Western University in London, Ontario. He has published widely in the fields of Canadian literature and culture and Victorian literature and art, and on the importance of the Arts and Humanities in society. His publications include Mimic Fires: Accounts of Early Long Poems on Canada (1994), Mnemographia Canadensis:  Essays on Memory, Community, and Environment in Canada (1999), The Confederation Group of Canadian Poets, 1880-1897 (2004), Canadian Architexts: Essays on Literature and Architecture in Canada, 1759 -2006 (2009), By Necessity and Indirection: Essays on Modernism in Canada (2015), and, on Archibald Lampman specifically, Fairy Tales (1999) Untitled Fragment of a Novel (2014), and Scribe: Archibald Lampman and Episkopon. A Facsimile Edition (2015). In 2015 he was awarded the Killam Prize in Humanities.

[:en]Incident at Congress 2019[:fr]Incident au Congrès[:]

[:en]ACQL’s Executive Board would like to speak on behalf of all its members to express regret for the case of racial profiling that took place on June 2, 2019 at the annual Congress for the Humanities and Social Sciences, hosted by the University of British Columbia. We urge the Federation Executive to investigate this matter to ensure that future Congresses remain open and inclusive spaces of intellectual and cultural exchange. We would also like to take this moment to reaffirm our association’s promotion of diversity in all of its forms.[:fr] 

Au nom de tous les membres de l’ALCQ, le Bureau exécutif souhaite exprimer ses regrets au sujet du profilage racial qui a eu lieu le 2 juin 2019 lors du Congrès annuel des Sciences humaines et sociales qui s’est tenu à l’Université de la Colombie-Britannique.

Nous pressons le Bureau de la Fédération d’enquêter sur cette affaire pour s’assurer que les futurs Congrès demeurent des espaces ouverts et inclusifs pour les échanges intellectuels et culturels.

Nous souhaitons également à cette occasion réaffirmer que notre association valorise la diversité dans toutes ses formes.[:]

[:en]Rita Bode and Jean Mitchell, winners of the Gabrielle Roy Prize 2018[:fr]Rita Bode et Jean Mitchell, lauréats du Gabrielle Roy Prize 2018[:]

[:en]Rita Bode and Jean Mitchell, winners of the Gabrielle Roy Prize 2018[:fr]Rita Bode et Jean Mitchell, lauréats du Gabrielle Roy Prize 2018[:]

[:en]

Rita Bode and Jean Mitchell are the winners of the Gabrielle Roy Prize 2018 for their edited collection on L.M. Montgomery and the Matter of Nature(s) published by McGill-Queen’s University Press.

The jury was composed of Alison Calder (University of Manitoba), Ian Rae (King’s College, Western University), and Andrea Cabajsky (Université de Moncton, President of the jury). The prize was awarded at a reception held by the Association for Canadian and Quebec literatures on the evening of June 1st in Vancouver.

The jury praised this well-curated collection of essays approaches the intersection of humanity and ‘nature’ from diverse and exciting perspectives. Although the individual essays come from a variety of fields, including (but not limited to) literature, animal studies, and law, the collection is both concise and coherent. These excellent analyses of familiar texts and figures provide new and useful insights into individual works and the larger field of ecocritical studies generally. L.M. Montgomery and the Matter of Nature(s) illustrates what anyone familiar with the orchard in Anne of Green Gables already knows- -that Montgomery’s flair for pastoral writing is among her finest attributes as a serious writer. However, the conceptual underpinnings of the collection shed new light on how this relation between place and character is part of a more sophisticated ecology of beliefs and behaviours that are urgently needed in a world facing widespread environmental degradation, accelerating climate change, and mass extinctions of flora and fauna.

The jury would also like to congratulate the two other finalists in this year’s competition: Daniel Heath Justice for Why Indigenous Literatures Matter (Wilfrid Laurier University Press) and Michael A. Peterman for Delicious Mirth: The Life and Times of James McCarroll (McGill-Queen’s University Press).

Daniel Heath Justice’s rigorous but accessible study of North American Indigenous literatures makes a convincing argument for their importance to everyone. Stressing the need for individuals to restore and maintain meaningful relationships with the elements of the world around them, this book insists on making literary and personal connections that are both uncomfortable and joyful. It goes beyond advocating for a shift in the perception of Indigenous figures in literature, or the perception of Indigenous authors within contemporary canons and marketplaces, by also demonstrating the insights and ethical realignments produced by reading from an Indigenous perspective. With great patience, generosity, and humour, Justice illustrates a number of strategies readers can pursue to make this shift occur. Why Indigenous Literatures Matter is an important work that deserves a wide readership.”

The result of meticulous research over decades, Delicious Mirth illuminates both James McCarroll and the nineteenth-century literary and social contexts in which he moved. It marshals particular details in the service of a larger narrative of North American Irishness, suggesting the value of revisiting a prolific but now-forgotten literary figure. It also performs the surprising task of shedding new light on multiple genres: early Canadian poetry, early Canadian theatre history, and early Canadian political writing. Scholars interested in Thomas D’Arcy McGee, Susanna Moodie, Catharine Parr Traill, and other pre-Confederation literary figures will want to learn about the role that McCarroll played in Ontario’s cultural and political milieux.

Merci de vous référer à la page en anglais.
[:fr]

Rita Bode and Jean Mitchell are the winners of the Gabrielle Roy Prize 2018 for their edited collection on L.M. Montgomery and the Matter of Nature(s) published by McGill-Queen’s University Press.

The jury was composed of Alison Calder (University of Manitoba), Ian Rae (King’s College, Western University), and Andrea Cabajsky (Université de Moncton, President of the jury). The prize was awarded at a reception held by the Association for Canadian and Quebec literatures on the evening of June 1st in Vancouver.

The jury praised this well-curated collection of essays approaches the intersection of humanity and ‘nature’ from diverse and exciting perspectives. Although the individual essays come from a variety of fields, including (but not limited to) literature, animal studies, and law, the collection is both concise and coherent. These excellent analyses of familiar texts and figures provide new and useful insights into individual works and the larger field of ecocritical studies generally. L.M. Montgomery and the Matter of Nature(s) illustrates what anyone familiar with the orchard in Anne of Green Gables already knows- -that Montgomery’s flair for pastoral writing is among her finest attributes as a serious writer. However, the conceptual underpinnings of the collection shed new light on how this relation between place and character is part of a more sophisticated ecology of beliefs and behaviours that are urgently needed in a world facing widespread environmental degradation, accelerating climate change, and mass extinctions of flora and fauna.

The jury would also like to congratulate the two other finalists in this year’s competition: Daniel Heath Justice for Why Indigenous Literatures Matter (Wilfrid Laurier University Press) and Michael A. Peterman for Delicious Mirth: The Life and Times of James McCarroll (McGill-Queen’s University Press).

Daniel Heath Justice’s rigorous but accessible study of North American Indigenous literatures makes a convincing argument for their importance to everyone. Stressing the need for individuals to restore and maintain meaningful relationships with the elements of the world around them, this book insists on making literary and personal connections that are both uncomfortable and joyful. It goes beyond advocating for a shift in the perception of Indigenous figures in literature, or the perception of Indigenous authors within contemporary canons and marketplaces, by also demonstrating the insights and ethical realignments produced by reading from an Indigenous perspective. With great patience, generosity, and humour, Justice illustrates a number of strategies readers can pursue to make this shift occur. Why Indigenous Literatures Matter is an important work that deserves a wide readership.”

The result of meticulous research over decades, Delicious Mirth illuminates both James McCarroll and the nineteenth-century literary and social contexts in which he moved. It marshals particular details in the service of a larger narrative of North American Irishness, suggesting the value of revisiting a prolific but now-forgotten literary figure. It also performs the surprising task of shedding new light on multiple genres: early Canadian poetry, early Canadian theatre history, and early Canadian political writing. Scholars interested in Thomas D’Arcy McGee, Susanna Moodie, Catharine Parr Traill, and other pre-Confederation literary figures will want to learn about the role that McCarroll played in Ontario’s cultural and political milieux.

Merci de vous référer à la page en anglais.
[:]